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2021 AAPT Summer Meeting Workshops

AAPT-Registration
When
7/10/2021 - 8/14/2021

Program

   

Saturday, 10 July 2021

 
Participants will learn how to modify introductory physics courses at any level to help students acquire a good conceptual foundation, apply this knowledge in problem solving, and engage them in science practices. The framework for these modifications is Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE). We provide tested curriculum materials including: (a) The second edition of College Physics Textbook by Etkina, Planinsic and Van Heuvelen, the Physics Active Learning Guide and the Instructor Guide; (b) a website with over 200 videotaped experiments and questions for use in the classroom, laboratories, and homework; (c) a set of innovative labs in which students design their own experiments. During the workshop the participants will learn how to use the materials in in college and high school physics courses to help their students learn physics by practicing it. We will focus on the transition to online learning brought about by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and the possibilities and challenges of engaging students in authentic scientific practices in an online learning environment.
Time
7/10/2021 11:00 AM - 7/11/2021 3:00 PM
11:00 AM
Moving Towards Accessibility in Physics Education with Universal Design for Learning- This workshop will introduce participants to the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework as a tool to design instruction and curricula that support variation in learners’ needs, abilities and interests, with specific focus on students with disabilities. The UDL guidelines emphasize providing supports and options for how students receive information (representation), demonstrate their understanding (action and expression), and engage with the content (engagement). Research shows that popular physics curricula do not enact many UDL-aligned practices. Attendees will have the opportunity to: 1) reflect on the impact of ableism on physics culture; 2) reflect on their role in designing instruction that supports students with disabilities; 3) practice applying the guidelines to identify barriers in the learning environment and to design options and supports in sample written curricula and instructional scenarios; 4) reflect on their own written curricula and/or classroom practices and design UDL-aligned strategies to implement; and 5) contribute to a list of resources for continuing to plan and implement strategies to make their instruction more accessible. This workshop will be appropriate for high school teachers, college/university instructors, and curriculum developers. Workshop content will incorporate views of students with disabilities about student-centered active learning STEM courses.
Time
12:00 PM - 4:00 PM
12:00 PM
How does the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum acquire and preserve artifacts? And then how do those artifacts become educational exhibits that you can use in your classrooms? Two representatives of the Air and Space Museum will present the inner workings of the museum process and show how objects go from forgotten to unforgettable. Participants will then learn how to use resources from the museums in their own teaching.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
Physics Education Research has long collected quantitative data sets. These data sets have been traditionally examined using descriptive statistics and classical analysis frameworks. Machine learning has expanded the traditional analysis toolbox by adding tools that are more adept at examining data commonly collected in PER (e.g., categorical data, text data, social network data). The University of Oslo/Michigan State University joint Learning Machines Lab (http://learningmachineslab.github.io) has created a collection of Jupyter notebooks that introduce researchers in DBER to machine learning. This workshop will bridge the gap between the traditional quantitative data sets collected by PER and new machine learning tools available in the python programming environment. Participants will be exposed to various modeling techniques (regression and classification) and will participate in a group research project using real PER data. Participants should have a laptop with Anaconda Python 3.x installed.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
Steve Turley, a former Program Officer at the National Science Foundation, will lead this workshop on how to write a strong grant proposal. While the discussion will specifically focus on proposals written to the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation, most of the principles we discuss should be broadly applicable to other NSF divisions and other funding agencies. In the workshop we will practice outlining and writing various parts of a proposal (project description, project summary, budget, postdoc mentoring plan, management plan, program evaluation, data management plan, etc.), do a mock review of a sanitized version of a previously submitted proposal, and discuss the proposal review process and timelines. We will also discuss the major elements of different funding opportunities for research related to physics education at the National Science Foundation such as Workshops, Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE), Scholarships in STEM (S-STEM), the Robert Noyce Scholarship Program, Advanced Technical Education (ATE), and EHR Core Research (ECR).
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
Learn to use free, accessible tools to infuse coding into your curriculum. Like having students use spreadsheets to analyze and visualize data, we’ll use Jupyter notebooks to extend that experience to working with big datasets from current research, demystifying coding, and collaborating on group-worthy tasks. Activities are designed around inquiry and learning cycle. Use them as-is or adapt this approach for any topic you teach. Suitable for total beginners to experienced programmers.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
Measuring and Improving Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Student Assistants in Introductory Physics Classes Are you teaching a large introductory physics course with learning assistants? Would you like a way to assess your learning assistants, particularly how effectively they can guide students using questioning? Are you using questioning in your physics teaching? Questioning is an effective strategy for learning assistants to interact with students as opposed to directly delivering knowledge to students. We developed a preliminary instrument to assess learning assistants’ PCK (Pedagogical Content Knowledge) skills in the context of questioning. We developed two versions of a written instrument, one with open-ended questions and one with ranking format. These questions describe various scenarios in inquiry-based settings about classical mechanics and electromagnetism. In this workshop, we will present sample questions of different formats and actual learning assistant answers to those questions. We will demonstrate how we infer learning assistants’ PCK from their written responses. From this workshop, participants will access a preliminary valid instrument for PCK measurement including sample questions and the grading rubric. Participants will learn how to use this instrument for formative/summative assessment or for use in periodic assessment and training. Instructors and high school teachers without learning assistants can also use this tool to reflect on questioning practices. Workshop Organizers:  Jianlan Wang, Stephanie Hart, Kyle Wipf
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Sunday, 11 July 2021

 
In physics, we often just focus on the forces or motion of one object that we treat as a dot. But real objects are more complicated, and every object can be thought of as part of a large system. Learning to think in terms of multiple systems can help students see problems from multiple perspectives or at multiple scales, allowing them to find new insights or simplify their work. In this workshop, we will explore the concept of systems and system models. This NGSS crosscutting concept can be integrated into the four fundamental models of introductory physics (kinematics, forces, energy, and momentum) with small changes or additions that help students think in terms of systems. We will explore using systems thinking in the four models through labs, problems, and discussions. Thinking in terms of systems will even allow us to naturally develop the idea of center of mass. Although we hope that this workshop will be interesting to a wide audience, our target audience is high school teachers.
Time
11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
11:00 AM
Underrepresentation Curriculum: Social Justice in the Physics Classroom: Motivated by our shared desire to address under-representation in physics and support systematically marginalized groups, we have created a flexible, modular curriculum designed to help physics instructors bring conversations about science and society into our classrooms. Topics include: under-representation in STEM, systemic racism, implicit bias, stereotype threat, and the myth of meritocracy in a physics context. Attendees will experience the curriculum first-hand, and learn how to implement it in their own classrooms.
Time
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
12:00 PM
Want to write assessments that will give you more evidence about what your students are actually able to do with their physics knowledge? If so, then this is the workshop for you. Participants will learn how to use the Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol (3D-LAP; a research-based protocol) to develop in-class, homework, and exam problems that engage students in both the process and content of physics. This instrument was developed to help assessment authors at all levels generate questions that include scientific practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas, the three dimensions used to develop the Next Generation Science Standards. Join us to learn how to create the next generation of physics assessments.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
The Departmental Action Team Model: Cultivating Sustainable Changes in University Departments: Creating sustainable change in university departments can be a difficult challenge to achieve. For the past several years, we have been creating Departmental Action Teams (DATs), which are teams of 4 to 8 faculty members, staff, and/or students that are created by a department and facilitated by our project team to achieve two goals: (1) to create sustainable change related to undergraduate education in the department by shifting departmental structures and culture and (2) to help DAT participants become change agents through developing facilitation and leadership skills. In this workshop, we will support participants in learning how to more effectively create change related to undergraduate education in their departments. Participants should expect to deepen their knowledge of change and to develop practical skills for enacting change. The workshop will be informed both by literature on organizational change, facilitation, and higher education and our team’s own experience in working with over a dozen DATs at two universities.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
QUANTUM…..a word that is intimidating and scary to most. Tell a “non physics” friend that you are teaching quantum this week and notice how the conversation stops. It is time to embed quantum into secondary curriculum and see how connections can be made between concepts already taught and the intriguing quantum we now know it imperative to our technology. This workshop will focus on components of physics curriculum, specifically Malus Law, that are directly related to quantum. Learn how to go from understanding polarized sunglasses to exclusive states in your classroom. Learn why this is important to quantum security and cryptography. Quantum is for all. There is an extra $15 cost of this workshop to help cover the cost of supplies.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
Ever wondered how to integrate a little bit of coding into a high school physics or physical science class without overwhelming your students or taking up lots of class time? This hands on workshop will provide an overview of simple, conceptually-motivated “STEMcoding” exercises where students construct PhET-like games like asteroids and angry birds using an in-browser editor that works great on chromebooks or whatever devices you have. To give participants more face-to-face interaction during the session we will spend significant time in zoom breakouts led by teachers who are experienced with using STEMcoding activities in their classes. The $20 surcharge on this workshop will be used in part to compensate these breakout leaders. You will also be able to set up an account on the STEMcoding learning management system (http://stemcoding.herokuapp.com) where you will be able to enroll an unlimited number of students in the courses you create. This learning management system helps to facilitate the grading of STEMcoding activities in a way that, for example, is not possible with the free versions of the activities that are available from the STEMcoding youtube channel (http://youtube.com/c/STEMcoding). The STEMcoding project is led by Prof. Chris Orban from Ohio State Physics and Prof. Richelle Teeling-Smith in the physics department at the University of Mt. Union. A $20 per participant surcharge on the workshop. These funds help pay server costs related to stemcoding.herokuapp.com
Time
2:01 PM - 6:00 PM
2:01 PM
Come turn up the volume in your classroom!  Help pre-college students and teachers in your area and have fun while you do it.  This workshop uses a variety of instructional activities and demos to teach about waves and sound.  There will be connections made to children's literature selections.  Materials will be aligned with NGSS.
Time
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
6:00 PM

Saturday, 17 July 2021

 
The muon—the electron’s heavier cousin—will be the star of this show as we dive into activities from the QuarkNet Data Activities Portfolio that feature this elementary particle. Learn how to engage your students in authentic scientific investigations with data from CERN, Fermilab, and cosmic ray muon detectors. In addition, you will find out how these activities connect to the standards and content you teach in your introductory physics courses as you discuss classroom implementation with other participants.
Time
11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
11:00 AM
Examining the Relationships Among Intuition, Reasoning, and Conceptual Understanding in Physics: We have been investigating the relationships among students' intuition, reasoning, and conceptual understanding in physics. A major part of this project has been the development of assessment tasks and methods for disentangling conceptual understanding and reasoning. We have drawn on dual-process theories of reasoning from cognitive science in the interpretation of student learning data, and the development of instructional interventions to improve student reasoning. In this workshop, participants will engage with these issues by examining written student responses and viewing and discussing video. We will present curricular interventions developed in alignment with dual-process theories and will describe a framework that can be used for the development of additional interventions.
Time
12:00 PM - 4:00 PM
12:00 PM
Fluids statics and dynamics are topics you might be tempted to cover lightly in an already packed introductory course for life science students; and you might be especially tempted to leave out viscous fluids which are not part of the standard physics presentation. Yet life always unfolds in a viscous fluid environment. Understanding fluids can help students understand organismal form and function as well as animal behavior. This workshop will give participants time to understand the value of fluids to life science students, how they can make time for fluids in a packed course, and how they can lower the barrier to including more fluids topics. Participants will spend most of the workshop going through curricular materials on fluids in biological contexts; these materials are available on the Living Physics Portal. Bringing your own laptop is highly recommended.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
How Small is A Neutrino? - Scale, Proportion and Quantity: Modeling the size of an atom and its constituents is a common activity to demonstrate the relative sizes of very small objects. But how can you extend these activities to the smallest and most abundant of the small - a neutrino, and at the same time explain why you need to build the largest detectors in the world to detect them? In this workshop, we will explore activities for making the conceptual leap from thinking about the world as matter with the textbook definition of being something that has weight and takes up space (can be seen and felt) to an understanding of the world as made up of infinitesimally small particles that require, in some cases, large detectors a mile underground to study. This workshop should give educators from fifth grade up tools for introducing neutrino physics to their students.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM
This workshop will provide attendees with hands on experience organizing open educational resources (OER) into online learning modules according to the principles of Mastery-based learning, as well as access to 70 Online learning modules for introductory Newtonian Mechanics. Online learning modules effectively blends assessment, instruction and practice into modularized units, allowing students to determine their own pace of learning, and facilitates data collection and analysis. We will demonstrate Obojobo Next, a free opensource platform developed by University of Central Florida designed specifically for modularized instructional design, provide information for adopting the platform, and discuss to how to implement mastery-based learning on popular LMS and online platforms. For best experience, participants are recommended to have a development course on an online learning platform of their choice.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Saturday, 07 August 2021

 
Join this fully reimbursable workshop to engage in integrated activities appropriate for high school and introductory college physics and astronomy teachers who want to teach with integration and authentic NASA data. Attendees will use resources developed and tested by physics education researchers through the NASA Space Science Education Consortium, including labs, lecture tutorials, clicker questions, and diagnostic assessments. These materials address topics that integrate Physics, Earth Science, and Space Science, including (1) coronal mass ejection videos to understand both simple mechanics as well as accelerations of relativistic particles, (2) sunspot data to understand period and frequency, (3) eclipses to understand geometric optics, (4) auroral currents to understand electromagnetism, and other activities, as can be found on https://aapt.org/resources/SSEC/. (This workshop is fully funded by a NASA Grant/Cooperative Agreement Number NNX16AR36A awarded to Temple University and the AAPT. Participants who complete the workshop may seek full reimbursement of their workshop registration fee.)
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Saturday, 14 August 2021

 
During this ½ day virtual workshop, we will introduce you to the Physics Instructional Resource Association (PIRA) and the PIRA 200. Almost every demonstration one can think of has a catalog number within the Demonstration Classification System (DCS); we will introduce you to this system and the comprehensive bibliography that details journal articles and demonstration manuals for construction and use in the classroom. The PIRA 200 are the specific 200 most important and necessary demonstrations needed to teach an introductory physics course. We will also show a subset of approximately 50 demonstrations explaining use, construction, acquisition of materials, and answer any questions in this highly interactive and dynamic environment.  Ideas for organizing and building your demonstration collection will be presented. We especially invite faculty members teaching introductory physics to attend.  NOTE that this is a paperless workshop.  All information and materials will be distributed on a USB thumb drive or via Zoom.  A computer, tablet, or other device capable of viewing and/or recording the virtual workshop will be needed.
Time
11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
11:00 AM