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2022 AAPT Summer Meeting - Grand Rapids, MI

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Please click here to read our Covid-19 policy.

AAPT Event Participation Code of Conduct:
By registering for the 2022 AAPT Summer Meeting you are agreeing to comply with the AAPT Event Participation Code of Conduct and Covid-19 Policy.

The American Association of Physics Teachers (“AAPT”) is dedicated to providing a safe and productive experience at all AAPT sponsored events for all event participants, regardless of sex, race, color, personal appearance, national origin, religion, age, physical disability, mental disability, perceived disability, medical condition, ancestry, marital status, sexual orientation, or any other basis protected by federal or applicable state laws or local ordinances.  Please click here to read the entire code of conduct.

Please note: Registering for the In-Person 2022 AAPT Summer Meeting provides access to On-Demand virtual sessions as well. The dates and times for the special events are subject to change. All times listed below are in Eastern Standard Time.

Cancellation Policy
50% refund until June 10th, 2022
No refund after  June 10th, 2022

To cancel your registration, please e-mail
programs@aapt.org

(onsite registration will not be available in the convention center, but you can register on-line)

When
7/9/2022 - 7/13/2022

Program

   

Saturday, 09 July 2022

Description
Web-based JS9 has the ability to display any FITS file, which is a good starting point for understanding a myriad of observations across the gamut of observed energies, from infra-red to gamma rays. FITS files, unlike standard JPEGs (which look the same) contain underlying data of position, energy, and arrival time of each photon in the image. Thus, students can explore energy spectra, light curves, periodic phenomena and a wealth of other analysis tasks that are fun and easy to use. This workshop will give participants the opportunity to do activities on element formation in supernova, supernova expansion, identifying white dwarfs and pulsars using light curves and rotation rates, making three color composites, and star formation in colliding galaxies as well as research opportunities using js9. Participants will be refunded the cost of the workshop.
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

Smartphones come equipped with high quality sensors which students can use to engage in science and engineering practices as they learn core physics concepts. Participants in this workshop will work through several example introductory lab experiments themselves taking data on their phone and will learn about the wide variety of sensors available to create introductory physics experiments for their own students. Participants should bring their own smartphone or tablet to this workshop. Organizer: Michelle Milne
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

Introduction to using Jupyter Notebook (Google CoLab, an online version) in the introductory physics classroom as an instructional resource for problem solving, modelling, and lab write-ups. The target audience are instructors in the high school and community college arena looking to use this open source resource for helping students explore physical models with computation. Using Google's CoLab (because of its zero setup and ready availability) we will cover the basics of the Jupyter notebook framework. The attendee will learn the basics of 'markdown' and LaTeX, the authoring tool for communicating through prose and mathematics as well as the basics of the python language. This is not intended as an exploration of programming. By using readily available libraries (most notably, numpy) the 'coding' skills needed are little more advanced that knowing how to use a modern graphical calculator. Participating instructors should be able to walk away with active worksheets and/or lab materials that they can use as a launching point for their own classes. A library of worksheets and lab starting points will also be made available as well. Organizer: Paul Beeken
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

Communicating the excitement of science is a specialized skill. This course is geared towards scientists who want to learn how to best engage an audience, targeting effective approaches to presenting scientific discovery and fundamentals. Organizer: Rebecca Thompson
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

Incorporating Mindfulness Practices into Physics Teaching: "Mindfulness is the act of paying attention to the present moment with an attitude of non-judgmental curiosity. There is a growing body of evidence* that the practice of mindfulness has significant positive impacts on both physical and mental health - for example, ameliorating stress and improving concentration. Since many students, perhaps especially those in introductory physics courses, report feeling stressed and also since they need to be able to concentrate to do physics (often in a different way than in other disciplines), offering them the tool of mindfulness makes perfect sense.  This workshop will begin with a brief overview of the science of mindfulness and the facilitator’s successes with incorporating mindfulness techniques in various types of college physics courses. The bulk of the workshop will be devoted to experiential exercises and group discussions. Attendees will learn and practice simple mindfulness techniques and will be provided resources designed to incorporate mindfulness activities into their courses.   In addition to teaching physics for over two decades, the facilitator for this workshop is a member of the Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education and a trained facilitator/instructor in various styles of mindfulness. *See, for example, (a) Davis and Hayes (“What Are the Benefits of  Mindfulness? A Practice Review of Psychotherapy-Related  Research”, (2011). Psychotherapy, Vol. 48 (2): 198-208)  for a review of psychological benefits; (b) Grossman, Niemann, Schmidt & Walach. (“Mindfulness-based stress reduction and health benefits: A meta-analysis.” J. of Psychosomatic Research. 2004; 57: 35-43) for a review of health benefits; and (c) https://korumindfulness.org/evidence/ for a more recent study of one particular method of teaching mindfulness"
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

Looking for a way to actively engage your students in learning core ideas in astronomy? The education team at Rubin Observatory has developed a new suite of classroom-tested online investigations that incorporate a unique combination of data-representations, simulations and analysis tasks to guide learners’ exploration of contemporary astronomy data. Each standalone investigation comes with a teacher guide, formative/summative assessments (think-pair-share, pre/post, and open-ended), and NGSS support (phenomenon, rubrics, etc.). The investigations are designed for novice learners from advanced middle school through the introductory college level and cover topics ranging from Hubble's Law to Hazardous Asteroids. This workshop will take a deep dive into an investigation on small bodies of the Solar System, that can enhance students’ data analysis and evidence-based reasoning abilities, and their understanding of Kepler’s Laws, Newton’s Laws, gravity, and the formation of the Solar System. Participants will have time to explore these new investigations and discuss ideas for successfully integrating them into their classroom. Please bring a laptop.  Participants will be reimbursed the registration fee after the completion of the workshopOrganizer: Ed Prather
Time
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
9:00 AM

The final Summit for the eAlliance project is scheduled to be held before the 2022 AAPT Summer Meeting in Grand Rapids, MI at the Amway Grand Plaza from July 9-10, 2022. The program will begin with an opening lunch at noon on Saturday, the 9th, and end shortly after lunch on the 10th so that you may attend afternoon workshops or meetings.
Category
eAlliance
Time
7/9/2022 12:00 PM - 7/10/2022 12:00 PM
12:00 PM

Explore Michigan’s Great Lakes aboard the GVSU research vessel, W.G. Jackson!  From GVSU’s Robert B. Annis Water Resources Institute (AWRI) in Muskegon, MI, enjoy a 2.5-hour cruise in which you will engage in hands-on water sampling measurement techniques as well as learn how water quality connects biology, physics, chemistry, and earth science. Participants will also learn about current research and outreach efforts at AWRI as they take in the view from Muskegon Lake and Lake Michigan. - Leave downtown GR 1:00pm.  Cruise lasts from 2:00 – 4:30 pm, return to GR by 5:30pm. - Transportation to the Lab will be by Van. If you have any ADA needs please reach out to programs@aapt.org.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:30 PM
1:00 PM

This workshop will share some of the successful resources developed by the NSF funded Quantum for All project.  The Quantum for All project is focusing on re-engineering STEM curriculum in order to provide QIS content and age appropriate resources for high school teachers to use in the classroom.  The project has provided professional development for hundreds of teachers and STEM camps for students in an effort to help re-engineer curriculum and provide QIS content that is age appropriate. This workshop will include what we have discovered to be most effective and the activities will be modeled by active engagement by participants. Organizer: Karen Jo Matsler
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

"In this workshop participants will go through the process of selecting a double star system to study, learn how to access Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO) remote telescopes, and be introduced to the basic research process for double star astrometry. The tools employed include a GAIA double star selection tool, remote access to LCO telescopes, and AstroImageJ for data analysis. Participants will receive access to the Canvas course with all course materials prepared for the seminar. We will also review the process whereby student and teacher teams learn how to write up their results for publication in the Journal of Double Star Observations (jdso.org).  Participants are encouraged to download AstroImageJ in advance of the workshop. https://www.astro.louisville.edu/software/astroimagej/". Organizer: Rachel Freed
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Creating Curricular Materials to Accompany Physics Simulations - "The goal of this workshop is, as a group, to create curricular materials (e.g., recitation activities, class worksheets, or simulation-based labs) that are based on this set of 200+ physics simulations that are aimed at introductory physics at the college level, as well as high school physics.  https://physics.bu.edu/~duffy/sims.html There are already some existing curricular materials, created by our Boston University group as well as by others, so we'll look at what already exists, and then take some time to build, individually or in small groups, more materials that we can share and make use of in our own classes. Organizer: Andrew Duffy
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

This workshop covers statistical tests for comparing two groups and a process for learning new statistical methods by applying these methods to common tasks in physics education research. The application, interpretation and limitations of common inferential tests will be emphasized by focusing on developing a conceptual understanding of variance in data, visualizations that account for variance, and the relationships between variance, effect sizes, and p-values. Participants will work in small groups with facilitators and participate in larger group discussions. They will compare scores on concept inventories and responses to a multiple-choice question using parametric tests for interval and ratio scale data and nonparametric tests for ordinal and nominal data. To facilitate these conversations, we will provide a working file in RStudio; however, participants do not need any prior experience with statistics or with RStudio. We invite more advanced RStudio users and quantitative researchers to participate and to support other participants. By focusing on the process for learning new statistical methods, participants will leave with skills and resources to conduct, evaluate, and report their own analyses.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

"This workshop will introduce participants to the Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) strategy. A method that has been shown to improve students’ results in a wide range of courses in physics and other subjects. JiTT combines well with other teaching methods, and can be viewed as a “partially flipped” classroom: students are encouraged prepare for class (but not necessarily with video) and class time is used for interactive activities (but only partially). It is flexible, and can easily be adapted to many courses, class sizes, and institutions.  JiTT incentivizes students to prepare for class, and uses the results of their preparations to improve what happens during class time. Students complete brief “warmup” assignments before each class. These assignments are not typical homework, rather, they are conceptual questions that students complete by reading the textbook or other assigned materials. The warmups are due a few hours to one day before class, allowing the instructor to read the students’ answers. As a result:  • Students are much more likely to prepare for class • Students’ reading of the text is more focused on important issues • Instructors see in advance what ideas have caused students the most difficulty and adjust plans “just in time.” • Instructors can use excerpts from the students’ answers in class, making the class more focused on students’ learning. I will present the reasoning behind the JiTT method, details of its use, and tips for how best to implement it in physics classes. Participants will discuss how it fits with their needs, and practice writing JiTT questions. Organizer: Andrew Gavrin
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Over the last few years, there has been a push to integrate computational modeling in the introductory physics curriculum. This is a workshop for novice coding learners, where participants will learn basic steps in WebVPython (also known as GlowScript) and practice with codes that demonstrate physics principles ranging from conceptual to calculus-based level. Participants will practice with activities that could be directly integrated into the classroom, starting with simple working codes where physical modelling will be incrementally added through guided steps. Further examples of classroom utilization of coding will be provided, and a discussion on the frequency of integration of computational methods in the classroom will be promoted. Participants are asked to bring their own laptops and to create an account in webvpython.org before arrival. This workshop is proudly supported by the Organization of Physics in Two Year Colleges, OPTYCs. Organizer: Thomas O’Kuma
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Modern Gravity: Bringing Relativity into Intro Physics & Astronomy Classrooms: Relativity is a subject of intense interest to students at all levels, and relevant and important in many astrophysical applications, as well as modern technology (notably, Global Positioning System). The goal of this workshop is to explore ways people have developed to bring this topic into the introductory physics and astronomy classroom, to discuss challenges and solutions people have experienced, and give attendees tools to connect their own classes to this exciting topic in modern physics.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

This workshop will give participants guided opportunity to design their own circuit board using the open-source KiCad package. It will cover how to make a schematic, how to turn the schematic into a board layout, and creation of Gerber files to turn the design into a physical device. It is intended to be taken with the "Surface Mount How-To (Techniques for building)" workshop, but can be taken by itself if desired. Organizer: Eric Ayars
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

During this ½ day workshop, we will introduce you to the Physics Instructional Resource Association (PIRA) and the PIRA 200. Almost every demonstration one can think of has a catalog number within the Demonstration Classification System (DCS); we will introduce you to this system and the comprehensive bibliography that details journal articles and demonstration manuals for construction and use in the classroom. The PIRA 200 are the specific 200 most important and necessary demonstrations needed to teach an introductory physics course. We will also show a subset of approximately 50 demonstrations explaining use, construction, acquisition of materials, and answer any questions in this highly interactive and dynamic environment. Ideas for organizing and building your demonstration collection will be presented. We especially invite high school physics teachers and faculty members teaching introductory physics to attend. NOTE that this is a paperless workshop. All information and materials will be distributed on a USB thumb drive (if requested) or other method. A computer, tablet, or other device capable of viewing and/or recording the workshop will be needed. Organizers: Dale Stille; Sam Sampere
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Sunday, 10 July 2022

Description
Supporting Educators Engaging in Equity Focused Scholarship of Teaching and Learning - The workshop will use short presentations, small group activities and large group discussions to build collaborations engaging in scholarship, research, or evaluation to support equity in physics courses. We will cover both qualitative and quantitative methods. Participants will explore research methods and frameworks to build a research plan and learn about ongoing educator led projects they can join. Following the workshop, participants will receive support from a network of scholar educators to engage in their own equity focused research in the fall of 2022. Long term, the network seeks to improve equity and student outcomes in physics courses and to present or publish the work we do together. This workshop is focused on supporting physics educators at teaching intensive institutions, two-year colleges, and minority-serving institutions to develop and share evidence-based practices that work for them and their students. Organizer: Jayson Nissen
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

Teaching Waves with PEER Physics Open Source Resources for General Physics - In this interactive workshop, participants will engage with the PEER Physics Waves unit. PEER Physics offers a suite of curricular resources, professional learning, and teacher networks, specifically geared toward the high school general physics classroom and enacting NGSS ideals. We are releasing open source (FREE!) materials for teaching waves, aligned with the NGSS. Dive into these new resources while considering ways of supporting students with the process of building claims from evidence. Participants will engage with student work to ultimately characterize the classroom conditions necessary for students to build claims and develop models from evidence. Participants will discuss their roles in helping students integrate physics content and scientific practices as they develop models, explanations, and principles that explain the physical world. Organizer: Emily Quinty
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

Coding Integration and Data Science Integration in High School Physics and Physical Science - Ever wondered how to integrate a little bit of coding or data science into a high school physics or physical science class without overwhelming your students or taking up lots of class time? This hands-on workshop will provide an overview of simple, conceptually-motivated “STEMcoding” exercises where students construct PhET-like games like asteroids and angry birds using an in-browser editor that works great on chromebooks or whatever devices you have. We will also provide a tutorial of the STEMcoding Object Tracker which is a browser-based program that can track the motion of brightly colored objects against a solid colored background. Students can analyze the tracking data in Excel or Google sheets to extract the velocity and acceleration as a hands-on introduction to data science. These activities are part of a much wider curriculum that is highlighted on the STEMcoding YouTube channel (http://youtube.com/c/STEMcoding). The STEMcoding project is led by Prof. Chris Orban from Ohio State Physics and Prof. Richelle Teeling-Smith in the physics department at the University of Mt. Union. AIP Grant Funds will reduce the price of this workshop. Participants will be reimbursed $50 post-workshop. Organizer: Chris Orban
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

Want to write assessments that will give you more evidence about what your students are actually able to do with their physics knowledge? If so, then this is the workshop for you. Participants will learn how to use the Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol (3D-LAP; a research-based protocol) to develop in-class, homework, and exam problems that engage students in both the process and content of physics. This instrument was developed to help assessment authors at all levels generate questions that include scientific practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas, the three dimensions used to develop the Next Generation Science Standards. Join us to learn how to create the next generation of physics assessments. Organizer: James Laverty
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

In this workshop we will share strategies and resources for recruiting students into physics, chemistry, math and general science teaching careers. The strategies include recommendations for sharing facts about teaching, how to talk to students, listing of venues for reaching students, updated recommendations and resources for sharing the facts virtually. The online resources provided include student presentations, posters, brochures, program flyer templates and presentations for faculty and staff who advise students. All materials are professional quality, research-based and have been extensively user-tested. These materials have been developed as part of Get the Facts Out, an NSF funded project for changing the conversation around STEM teaching recruitment. The project is a partnership between the American Physical Society, American Chemical Society, the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, and AAPT led by the Colorado School of Mines. This workshop is fully funded by NSF #1821710 & 1821462. Participants who complete this workshop can be reimbursed for their workshop registration fee. Organizer: Drew Isola
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

In this workshop, we will show you ways in which computation can be integrated into your upper-level physics courses. The PICUP partnership has developed a variety of computational activities for teaching physics, and we will show you how you can take these PICUP materials and adapt them to fit your needs. PLEASE BRING A LAPTOP COMPUTER. Organizer: Todd Zimmerman
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

This workshop will describe and illustrate early efforts to utilize student smartphones in and out of the college introductory astronomy classroom. These devices are extremely prevalent in today’s society and our students have a very strong devotion to them. Smartphones offer a unique opportunity to forge connections between students and science content.  Participants will be exposed to an HTML5 ranking task editor and examples created in it. The necessary steps to create a task will be outlined and then participants will be asked to create their own ranking task online and save it locally.  We will then describe the desirable characteristics of HTML5 simulations targeted at smartphones and examples illustrating these characteristics. Participants will experience a smartphone simulation as a student and another as an instructor, formulating a plan for guiding their students in its usage. Special emphasis will be placed on eclipse simulations, useful for the upcoming widely observable solar eclipses in 2023 and 2024.  We will conclude with a discussion of current thinking regarding “best practices” for smartphone usage in the classroom, covering what is known and brainstorming on what is unknown.  It is expected that participants will have a smartphone in hand that they will be putting to work accessing astronomy content through QR codes. It would be optimal if they also had a laptop for ranking task creation." Organizer: Kevin Lee / Participants will be reimbursed $45 after the completion of the workshop
Time
8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
8:00 AM

MSU National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab and Facility for Rare Isotope Beams tour - Explore a world-class rare isotope laboratory where nuclei are smashed into a target at nearly half the speed of light! Our tour includes demonstrations, an introduction to the goals and methods of nuclear science, and a walk behind the scenes where nuclei are accelerated, filtered and detected. The secrets we learn could help explain what happens in supernovae and the origins of elements that make up the human body.  You can learn more at the NSCL Tours website http://www.nscl.msu.edu/public/tour/index.html.  - Leave downtown GR 1:00pm.  Tour starts 2:30pm and lasts ~90 minutes, return to GR approx. 5:30pm. - Transportation to the Lab will be by Van. If you have any ADA needs please reach out to programs@aapt.org.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:30 PM
1:00 PM

Surface Mount Electronics How-To (Techniques for Building) - This workshop will give participants guided opportunity to build a circuit board using modern surface-mount components. It will cover a variety of techniques including hand-soldering, hot-air reflow, solder paste and stencils, and reflow ovens. It is intended to be taken with the "Surface Mount How-To (Design with KiCad)" workshop, but can be taken by itself if desired. Organizer: Eric Ayars
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Labs and activities dealing with green and renewable energy, energy and the environment, and sustainability are great for getting students interested in and excited about science. Putting physics in this context can make it more real and relevant for the students. This workshop will engage participants in several green-themed activities that could be used for classroom laboratories or for outreach. These labs and activities can be implemented at relatively low cost. Organizers: Joe Kozminski, Autumn Crisafulli
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Improving the Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Teaching Assistants and Instructors - Being aware of common student alternate conceptions in physics is beneficial when designing instruction to help students develop a coherent knowledge structure. It is thus not surprising that knowledge of common student difficulties is one aspect of what Shulman coined “pedagogical content knowledge”, or in other words, knowledge about how to teach a subject that is different from the content knowledge itself. This workshop will first explore the literature on the extent to which TAs (undergraduate and graduate students teaching labs and recitations) and instructors are aware of various introductory student alternate conceptions. Participants will identify common alternate conceptions of students in certain question and discuss potential uses in a professional development class. In addition, participants will discuss productive approaches to help both TAs and instructors learn about these alternate conceptions and integrate this knowledge into their pedagogical design. Organizer: Alexandru Maries
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Learning assistants (LAs) are pivotal to non-traditional physics instruction in large classrooms. However, how well are our learning assistants actually able to teach and to guide by questioning? Do they have sufficient pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) to be effective in the classroom, particularly in inquiry-based and studio-style classrooms? How can we help them improve their PCK?   We have developed two written instruments to assess LA’s PCK in the context of questioning (PCK-Q), free-response and a Likert-style instrument. Both instruments can be used either as semester pre- and post- instruments or as individual questions to guide LA preparation sessions throughout the semester. We will discuss the development and validation processes. Participants will work through and discuss sample problems, scoring and possible uses of each version of the instrument for assessing LA’s PCK-Q and as part of LA training sessions.
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Assessing Mathematical Reasoning Development in Physics using the Physics Inventory of Quantitative Literacy (PIQL) - Productive mathematical sensemaking is a habit of mind common to students who are successful in learning introductory physics (Sherin 2001). It underpins introductory physics courses and is reflected in the Science Practices of both the NGSS, and the AP Physics tests. Currently, there are very few validated tools for instructors interested in developing mathematical sensemaking in their instruction. This workshop introduces the Physics Inventory of Quantitative Literacy (PIQL), a new research-validated assessment tool for assessing mathematical sensemaking that is foundational to introductory physics (White Brahmia et al. 2021.) The PIQL is designed for instructors to assess the effectiveness of their efforts to help their students develop the quantitative reasoning habits of mind foundational to introductory physics courses - as well as the NGSS and AP Physics curriculum framework. Participants will learn about expert frameworks that help characterize mathematical reasoning in introductory physics. They will engage in collaborative activities to clarify the kind of reasoning that is being assessed on the PIQL, and why it is important. We will discuss methods for scoring PIQL responses and how to interpret the results. Participants will then form working groups and brainstorm about the physics contexts in which this mathematical reasoning is particularly important. The workshop will finish with a whole-group discussion of instructional activities currently available that show promise for improving the kind of reasoning measured by the PIQL. Organizer: Trevor Smith
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Workshop demonstrating how to make use of household materials to construct useful tools for performing physics experiments. Emphasis will be on common, inexpensive materials. Workshop will be divided into three parts, a presentation, a brainstorming session, and a construction phase, during which participants will build and test their own pieces of apparatus made from commonly available materials. All materials will be provided. Organizer: Stephen Irons
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

The moun—the electron’s heavier cousin—will be the star of this show as we dive into activities from the QuarkNet Data Activities Portfolio that feature this elementary particle. Learn how to engage your students in authentic scientific investigations with data from CERN, Fermilab, and cosmic ray muon detectors. In addition, you will find out how these activities connect to the standards and content you teach in your introductory physics courses as you discuss classroom implementation with other participants. Please bring a laptop with you to this workshop. Organizer: Shane Wood
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Creating Physics Online Learning Modules from Open Education Resources - This NSF funded workshop has three main goals: First, it introduces participants to mastery-based online learning modules, a highly effective and flexible instructional design for improving online or blended courses, by organizing online learning resources into learning modules. Second, it introduces participants to a set of high quality, openly available online learning modules created for calculus based introductory physics, including hundreds of assessment problems, figures and text. Finally, it walks the participants through the process of designing and creating an online learning modules sequence, providing them with hands-on experience of creating their own first module, using several freely or widely available software for content creation. In addition, the organizers will also discuss with interested participants about advanced data analysis methods for identifying and interpreting student learning behavior from data collected from online learning modules, and showcase of Obojobo learning modules platform developed by the University of Central Florida. Organizer: Zhongzhou Chen
Time
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
1:00 PM

This workshop is appropriate for college and university instructional laboratory developers. At each of five stations, presenters will demonstrate an approach to an intermediate or advanced laboratory exercise. Each presenter will show and discuss the apparatus and techniques used. Attendees will cycle through the stations and have an opportunity to use each apparatus. Documentation will be provided for each experiment, with sample data, equipment lists, and construction or purchase information. Organizer: Jeremiah Williams
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Students often learn and work in groups, and scientists also work in teams. How can we make sure that the tasks we give students are really group-worthy? In Designing Groupwork: Strategies for the Heterogeneous Classroom, a group-worthy task is defined as one that is open-ended, provides multiple entry points and multiple ways to demonstrate knowledge, and requires positive interdependence from students. Because group-worthy tasks emphasize the value of multiple abilities and a range of approaches to a problem, they provide the opportunity for all students to engage deeply and meaningfully with the content. These types of tasks also often meet many of the NGSS Science and Engineering Practices. In this workshop, we will discuss characteristics of group-worthy tasks and share tasks that the presenters have used. Participants will also have the opportunity to work on adapting and applying these ideas for their own classrooms. Although we hope that this workshop will be interesting to a wide audience, our target audience is high school teachers. Organizers: Kelly O'Shea, Marta Stoeckel
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Engaging Students with their Knowledge: Building Scientific Practice into Instruction - Are you wondering how to help your students learn how to do physics, but not just know physics as a collection of facts? Participants in this workshop will explore how they create instructional materials that put their students’ knowledge to use the way scientists do while exploring phenomena. These "Scientific Practices" are described by the Next Generation Science Standards' 3-Dimensional Learning (3DL) framework. We'll focus on individual topics, starting with learning goals and the lesson plan for reaching that goal. To align our plan with a Scientific Practice, we'll make use of the 3DL Observation Protocol (3D-LOP), which we will introduce during the workshop. With this tool, you'll be able to explore not just examples from actual teaching but also your own as part of the process of creating Scientific Practice-centered instruction. Organizer: Paul Bergeron
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Examining the Relationships Among Intuition, Reasoning, and Conceptual Understanding in Physics - We have been investigating the relationships among students' intuition, reasoning, and conceptual understanding in physics. A major part of this project has been the development of assessment tasks and methods for disentangling conceptual understanding and reasoning. We have drawn on dual-process theories of reasoning from cognitive science in the interpretation of student learning data, and the development of instructional interventions to improve student reasoning. In this workshop, participants will engage with these issues by examining written student responses and viewing and discussing video. We will present curricular interventions developed in alignment with dual-process theories and will describe a framework that can be used for the development of additional interventions. Organizer: Andrew Boudreaux
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Engage with an NGSS aligned, active learning curriculum: Next Gen PET - In this session we will explore the NextGen Pet curriculum and share how faculty are working together as a community in its implementation in a FOLC (Faculty Online Learning Community). This curriculum is well-suited for pre-service elementary school teachers and for non-science majors completing their general education requirement in physical science. This session will be of interest for those wishing to hear of others’ implementation experiences for such a course and/or finding out about the successes of the NextGen PET FOLC itself. Organizer: Tamera Snyder
Time
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
1:00 PM

Ranked by Art Newspaper in the top 100 most-visited art museums worldwide, international destination Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park features bountiful gardens and more than 200 permanent collection works on a 158-acre main campus.  Meijer Gardens is the home of one of two casts of the 24-foot high American Horse, created by Nina Akamu and based on a work by Leonardo da Vinci.  Other horticultural highlights include the Richard & Helen DeVos Japanese Garden—the newest expansion of the park—and the Lena Meijer Tropical Conservatory.  The permanent sculpture collection—housed by indoors and outdoors—includes works by Edgar Degas and Auguste Rodin as well as those from Modern tradition masters such as Ai Weiwei, George Segal, and Mark di Suvero. - Leave downtown GR 1:30pm (arrive ~1:45pm), stay until closing 5:00pm, return to GR by 5:15 pm. - Transportation to the Park will be by Van. If you have any ADA needs please reach out to programs@aapt.org.
Time
1:30 PM - 5:15 PM
1:30 PM

Monday, 11 July 2022

Description
Monday, July 11 from 7:00 to 8:00 AM - Are you new to an AAPT National Meeting? If so, this is the best time to learn about AAPT and the Summer Meeting, as well as meet fellow attendees. AAPT leadership will be represented to discuss ways to get more involved with AAPT. You are also welcome to participate in any of AAPT's Area Committee meetings. Please reference the program for a committee meeting that piques your interest.
Time
7:00 AM - 8:00 AM
7:00 AM

Monday July 11th 12:00 to 1:00 PM - Relax, network and share your experiences and resources with members and friends of the community. Light refreshments will be provided.
Time
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
12:00 PM

Monday, July 11 from 12:30 to 1:30 PM - Join this special luncheon for K-12 physics teachers attending the conference for the first time. This luncheon is open to anyone who would like to attend. The dates and times are subject to change.
Time
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
12:30 PM

Monday, July 11 from 12:30 to 1:30 PM - Relax, network and share your experiences and resources with members and friends of the LGBTQ/Physics Community. Light refreshments will be provided. The dates and times are subject to change. (Organizers request that no photographs are taken at this event)
Time
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
12:30 PM

Enter the raffle for a chance to win a free Celestron 70mm Travel Scope
Time
12:45 PM - 1:00 PM
12:45 PM

Tuesday, 12 July 2022

Description
Tuesday, July 12 from 6:00 to 8:00 AM - Walkers and runners get up and get going! Lace up your shoes and enjoy the fresh air with your colleagues. T-shirts will be provided courtesy of Vernier, as well as water and fruit. Specific details about the route will be emailed to all walkers and runners.  Walkers are encouraged to participate!
Time
6:00 AM - 8:00 AM
6:00 AM

Tuesday, July 12 from 7:00 to 8:00 AM - Two Year College staff begin their day by breaking bread and sharing ideas.
Time
7:00 AM - 8:00 AM
7:00 AM

Tuesday July 12th from 12:00pm to 1:00 pm. Registrants will be provided with light snacks.
Time
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
12:00 PM

Tuesday, July 12 from 12:30 to 1:30 PM - Career development and networking can be time consuming, so AAPT is offering a fun and exciting way to get connected to a large number of early career and seasoned physics professionals in a short amount of time. Speed networking provides the opportunity to discuss career goals and challenges with a new contact for five minutes, exchange information, and then move on to the next person. By the end of the event each participant will have meaningful interactions with over half a dozen colleagues and the opportunity to meet many more. If you think you made a good contact, follow up with the person and schedule a time to meet for coffee. It's that simple! By the end of the first day of the conference, you would have already made several personal connections with other attendees. If you have business cards, don't forget to bring them.
Time
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
12:30 PM

Tuesday, July 12 from 12:30 to 1:30 PM. Renew, reminisce and create alliances by networking and exchanging ideas with our long-served and deserving supporters of AAPT. The dates and times are subject to change.
Time
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
12:30 PM

Enter for a chance to win a free  Celestron 70mm Travel Scope
Time
12:45 PM - 1:00 PM
12:45 PM

Tuesday, July 12 from 9:00 PM to Midnight - Wind down the night and meet new friends with a round of table tennis, foos ball or bring your favorite game and deck of cards.
Time
9:00 PM - 11:59 PM
9:00 PM

Wednesday, 13 July 2022

Description
PERC provides an opportunity for those in the field of physics education research and allied fields to share their research, obtain feedback, explore diverse perspectives and discuss issues relevant to the community. In order to attend the PERC Conference, you must register for the AAPT meeting. Members may use any PERC administered grants to reimburse the cost of the PERC conference afterwards.

Virtual PERC provides an opportunity for those in the field of physics education research and allied fields to share their research, obtain feedback, explore diverse perspectives and discuss issues relevant to the community. In order to attend the Virtual PERC Conference, you must register for the AAPT Summer Meeting or register for one day at the In-Person AAPT Summer Meeting. Members may use any PERC administered grants to reimburse the cost of the PERC conference afterwards. (If you register for the PERC you will gain access to the On-Demand Summer Meeting)

Enter for a chance to win a free  Celestron 70mm Travel Scope
Time
12:45 PM - 1:00 PM
12:45 PM